Category : Paper

A Bookbinder’s Black Friday

A Bookbinders Black Friday - logo

Welcome to my 9th annual roundup of bookbinding-related Black Friday (and some beyond that) deals!

I did all of my damage during the Guild of Book Workers Standards of Excellence Seminar last month, so there will be no shopping for me. I also have a craft show this weekend and if I go shopping tomorrow, I won’t have enough time to panic the required amount.

There are several bookbinding-related online sales going on starting tomorrow (and some going on right now). Check ’em out:

On 11/29, Hiromi Paper is offering free domestic shipping on orders $100.00+ (after any discounts) with code kinyoobi2019. The offer is not valid on oversize items. On top of that, they’re having their annual sale from December 1 – 31. The sale is only for specific items, but the selection is pretty great. Discounts go as high as 50%. Subscribe to Hiromi’s newsletter to get the latest on what’s included in the sale.

Now through 12/21, Arnold Grummer is holding their Annual Press Sale. Discount varies depending on the press you choose. Please visit their website for more information. But wait, there’s more! On 11/28 – 11/29, they’re offering free domestic shipping on all orders – this is automatic, no code is needed. And on 11/30 – 12/2, they giving shoppers an additional $10% off any order (including presses). Use code SHOPSMALL before checkout to get the discount.

The Getty Store is offering 25% off sitewide now through 12/3. I’m mentioning this sale because they’re the publishers behind Artists and Their Books: Books and Their Artists by Marcia Reed and Glenn Phillips – a gorgeous book. Another interesting title is Books: A Living History by Martyn Lyons. Use code 25GIFT to get the discount. Now through 12/31, they’re also offering free standard domestic shipping on all orders $100.00+. 

Get 15% off everything at Volcano Arts now through 12/1. No code needed – your cart will take care of the discount for you. They also offer free domestic shipping on orders of $100.00+.

If you need preservation supplies, Gaylord Archival is offering 25% off your order with code BLACKFRIDAY now through 12/2. You can also get free domestic shipping on orders over $100.00.

Brodart is offering varying discounts on your order, depending on when you shop:

  • 11/27 – 11/28: Get a 20% discount on everything with code WT20.
  • 11/29 – 12/1: Get a 15% discount on everything with code F15.
  • 12/2: Get a 40% discount on consumable supplies over $209.00 with code X.

The Paper Mill Store is offering 10% off orders of $250.00+ with code 250SALE and 15% off orders of $500.00+ with code 500SALE. They also offer free shipping on all orders $149.00 and over. This is an ongoing promotion with no expiration date.

Paper Source is offering 50% off all purchases from the Paper Bar, now through 11/30. They’ve got text and cover weight paper in lots of colors and sizes (no code needed).

John Neal Bookseller has three offers:

  • Get free standard domestic shipping on orders of $100.00 or more. Use code BF19FS at checkout for the discount from now through 11:59 p.m. on 12/1.
  • Get up to 50% off Black Friday Sale items from now through 6:00 p.m. on 12/6 (a full week!) – save on books, supplies, and subscriptions to both Bound & Lettered and Letter Arts Review.
  • Now through 12/1, international customers can get $10 off every $100 spent by using code NONUS19 at checkout.

Now through 12/3, Paper-Papers is offering 50% off the already discounted price of products in their Clearance department. Use coupon code getdeal at checkout to get the discount.

From now through 12/2, Vintage Paper Co. is offering 20% off all weekend deal items with a total over £20 (approximately $26.00 USD). The discount will automatically be applied, no code needed.

Planning a trip to Japan, Paris, Italy, or London? Julie Auzillon is offering 20% off for today only and items include her wonderful series of paper tour guides. Another great option is her book Origata Binding: from Japanese wrapping to bookbinding.

As part of their holiday sale, Oak Knoll Books is offering 20% off all available titles. This sale is going on now through December 2nd and no special code is needed – the discount will be applied automatically.

Helen Hiebert is giving $10.00 off your entire purchase by entering the code turkey10 at checkout, now through 12/2. Among her offerings is her wonderful creative planner and how-to book of paper projects, The Paper Year. She also has a number of books available that should also appeal to the paper lover in your life (if not you).

Head on over to Washi Arts for 10% off all papers, tools, and supplies. Use code BLACK2019 at checkout – code valid only on 11/29.

By the way, don’t forget Giving Tuesday! There are lots of worthy organizations out there that would love your support. Here are some of my favorites:

Happy shopping and/or donating!

Meet the Custom Paper Pack!

So you’ve got a copy of The Paper Year (good for you) and now you need to figure out what papers to use for all of the projects. Let’s be real – if you have to source materials for twelve different projects, you might never actually use the planner.

Enter the Custom Paper Pack. This thing takes care of everything for you – it’s full of scrumptious papers from around the world. And the papers are oversized just a bit so you’ll have some left over. Why does that matter? Well, then you’ve got scraps to put into your planner’s super happy paper swatch place made just for that reason.

Check it out. It’s like when you’re a kid and you get a loot bag at the end of a birthday party:

Custom paper pack for The Paper Year - planner

And when you take out all of the goodies, it’s nothing but pure happiness:

Custom paper pack for The Paper Year - planner

Here’s a closer look at some of those non-paper things:

Items in the custom paper pack for The Paper Year - planner

Paper pulp? Hell yeah! In 2020 you’re going to make your own paper – with seed inclusions! Plantable goodness can be yours.

Truth be told, in my stash of paper I’m sure I have what I’d need to complete the projects. But I will say that the fun of the paper pack for me is that I get to discover new papers I don’t have. And who couldn’t use more paper? There’s some cork paper in there that I’m dying to play with. For each project, I’ll be mentioning other papers that would likely work for each one. 

Stay tuned as I work my way through the paper pack! 


** In the spirit of transparency, I need to mention that I received a Custom Paper Pack from Helen Hiebert to use for her planner projects, but I was not financially compensated in any way. All of the opinions expressed will be my own and will be based on my experiences working on the featured projects. **

Meet The Paper Year!

I am so excited to once again be teaming up with Helen Hiebert to share her latest creative project! I introduce to you – The Paper Year. While last year Helen offered The Twelve Months of Paper calendar, this year she’s upped her game with a planner. 

Cover of The Paper Year - planner

Although I love technology, I’ve never transitioned to using my phone as my planner. Paper planners and I are life partners (sorry phone).

Here’s a description of this little piece of awesomeness:

The Paper Year is a wire bound how-to book & monthly planner featuring 12 paper projects by Hedi Kyle & Ulla Warchol, Marianne Petit, Gina Pisello, Lore Spivey, Arnold Grummer’s and Helen Hiebert. Watch the short video and discover unique paper projects, unusual papers and a way to plan your creative year. The Paper Year makes a great gift for all of the creative people in your life, including you!

As I did last year, I’ll be going all Julie and Julia on this book, completing each project in the planner one at a time. This time around I’ll be presenting the results every other day starting on November 1st. Hey, that’s today!

I’ll post the structure of the day on Instagram (@blueroofdesigns), so be sure to follow me there. I’ll also be using #thepaperyear so it’s easy to find me. If you’re not into Instagram, don’t worry – I’ll also be writing blog posts with three-month roundups about once a week.

Let’s take a tour, shall we? In the front of the planner, you can plot out an overview of your year.

Interior page of The Paper Year - planner

After that are sections for each month that include a project with directions and images to help you along the way. I’m not going to show that to you now because I want each monthly project to be a surprise while I work on it.

Following that is even more room for planning after the project, including a day-by-day area, a notes section, and a design space for exploring the project further. Oh, and it has room for paper swatches!

Interior page of The Paper Year - planner

I’m really looking forward to the next few weeks – stay tuned as I work my way through the planner!


** In the spirit of transparency, I need to mention that I received a copy of The Paper Year from Helen Hiebert to review, but I was not financially compensated in any way. All of the opinions expressed will be my own and will be based on my experiences working on the featured projects. **

Book Arts Guide to Vermont Open Studio Weekend

Artist book by Elissa Campbell of Blue Roof DesignsWelcome to your Book Arts guide for Spring Open Studio Weekend 2019!

Vermont Open Studio Weekend is coming up this weekend (May 25 & 26)! I like supporting other book artists when I can, so I dedicate a blog post to them during every open studio event. There are four book artsy studios participating (besides mine) this spring.

I created the Google map at the bottom of this post which includes all of the studios to help you plan your travels. I wish I could say that the book arts studios are close to each other, but sadly, they’re not. Look at this way – you’ll get a really great tour of Vermont’s gorgeous landscape while on your travels.

I’ll be referring to studios by both name and number – the number refers to a listing in the yellow Spring Event and Resource Guide. The colors of the studio numbers in this post match the colored markers in the Google map. By the way, I’m studio #128.

There are several ways to get your hands on a map:

I tried to find the most direct route between the studios so you could avoid backtracking. This route starts at the northernmost studio and travels clockwise. And away we go!

The first studio is #1, Meta Strick – she does it all. Oh my goodness, her calligraphy! She does wonderful mixed media work, including dolls that have a book component. She has a great philosophy that you can make anything into a book – it should come as no surprise to you that she’s a teacher.

Next is #140, Ken Leslie. Ken often creates books in a circular format – a practice that developed out of his dissatisfaction with rectangular painting shapes. His themes frequently focus on natural cycles, such as day/night and the seasons. The size of his work ranges from miniature to really ginormous – you can walk through some of his books when they’re open.

Stop number three is studio #127 – Kelly McMahon of May Day Studio. Kelly is both a letterpress printer and a bookbinder. She carves many of her designs in linoleum for her beautiful gift wraps (which are totally frame-able). She was lucky enough to intern at the San Francisco Center for the Book, so you know she’s got skills. Kelly’s studio is about 1.6 miles from mine.

Last stop on the tour is studio #48 is Carolyn Shattuck, a seasoned printmaker and bookmaker. She often cuts up scrap monotypes and uses the pieces in her handmade books. For her, the book arts have been the focus of a body of work combining drawing and print assemblage techniques in three dimensional form. Many of her books include pop-up elements to set the scene for her deeply personal storytelling.

Here’s the aforementioned Google Map for planning your route:

If you go to any of the studios, please share your experiences in the comments below. And if you have pictures, I’d love to see them…sadly, I don’t get to leave my studio to visit others during the event.

Visit to Claire Maziarczyk’s Studio

This past Sunday, I had the good fortune of making a return trip to paste paper artisan Claire Maziarczyk‘s studio. My last visit was nearly ten years ago! Claire posted on the Book Arts Listserv that she was downsizing and was looking to sell not only her fabulous paste papers, but also supplies and equipment.

I made the journey with a few of my Book Arts Guild of Vermont cohorts so the trip didn’t seem as long as the 3.5+ hours it took for us to get there. Claire fed us lunch, which was awesome and extremely generous. By the end of our meal, I was itching to get downstairs to her studio to start the paper shopping.

To select which of her papers you like best must be like choosing your favorite child. I wanted all the things. It seemed wrong to leave any design behind, but I had a budget. Poop.

Here’s the pile of papers that made the final cut (it was a paper cut, so painful):

Pile of Japanese and paste papers

Let’s visit with them, shall we? Here are my paste paper purchases:

Claire once worked as a representative for the Japanese Paper Place and carried an inventory of their papers. After they both parted ways, the inventory remained. Lucky me! Here are my paper purchases from that gold mine:

Japanese papers

There was a sign by the paper on the left that labeled it as Kirogami, a hand-printed paper with a small design.

The paper on the right was double couched (two layers) – first a watermarked red sheet is made, then that sheet is couched on top of a white sheet. I have no idea what the text says. One day I’ll go over the whole sheet with Google Translate to satisfy my curiosity. It’s probably a grocery list.

The paper in the middle was also double couched and has a wonderful reflective quality (it’s stunning in person). Here’s a close up shot:

Japanese paper

I’m fairly certain that this paper is from Echizen, Japan, a papermaking village I visited 2.5 years ago. The technique used is known as hikkake, which means “to catch” or “to snag”. A metal screen is used to capture fibers that eventually create the pattern in the finished product. You can see an example of the screen on the Echizen Washi website.

My last purchase was serendipitous – I wasn’t looking for small sheets, but this pad of paper somehow caught my eye. The back of the pad was marked as Chigiri-e paper. I opened it up and encountered a gorgeous batch of 25 papers.

Pad of Chigiri-e paper

Oh, the Shiboris!

Japanese Shibori paper

Japanese Shibori paper

Japanese Shibori paper

These appear to be a variation of Unryu I’ve never seen before:

Japanese paper

So back to the Chigiri-e. I had no idea what it was, so I looked it up. This collage-based art form originated during the Heian period, the last division of classical Japanese history, taking place from 794 to 1185 (thanks Wikipedia). Handmade paper was the primary material used for these collages and pieces often incorporated calligraphy.

I now understand why this pad has 25 different kinds of paper in it – it’s kinda like a box of crayons, but with paper.

Claire showed us how to use her wood graining tool and then let us play with it. I probably could have left more open space between those knot holes. This is why it’s best to leave this work to the professionals.

Colored paste combed with a wood graining tool

After emptying our wallets, it was time to return home. We made it most of the way without incident until the weather. Oh geez, it was bad. The roads were icy and we were slipping around, which freaked me out. We decided to leave the interstate and take local roads in hopes of avoiding speed demons.

Unfortunately, this didn’t help us avoid other problems. We ended up getting stuck behind a car that couldn’t make it up a hill either because they didn’t have enough momentum and/or didn’t have the right tires on their car. Oh, and I really had to pee.

Long story short (and it’s a long story), it took 2.5+ hours for us to get moving again. Let’s hear it for Vermont’s emergency crews! Seriously though, the whole thing was terrifying. I’m so thankful for my companions, Judy and Becky, who kept me focused and calm. As much as I can ever be calm.

Claire told me that I should come back again with more people. If I do go back, it sure as hell won’t be during the winter!

A Bookbinder’s Black Friday

A Bookbinders Black Friday - logo

Welcome to my 8th annual roundup of bookbinding-related Black Friday deals! It’s that wonderful time of year when I think to myself Why don’t I have a massive bag of cash so I can buy all the things?

In all likelihood, I will not be leaving my house because I’ve got a craft show tomorrow and I’m engaged in my annual Holy crap, I don’t have enough inventory freak out. I see both caffeine abuse and lack of sleep in my future.

There are quite a few bookbinding-related online sales going on today (and some beyond that). Check ’em out:

The Getty Store is offering 25% off sitewide now through 11/28. I’m mentioning this sale because they’re the publishers behind Artists and Their Books: Books and Their Artists by Marcia Reed and Glenn Phillips – a gorgeous book. Use code 25HOL to get the discount.

Now through 12/21, Arnold Grummer is holding their Annual Press Sale. Discount varies depending on the press you choose. Please visit their website for more information.

On 11/23 only, Hiromi Paper is offering free domestic shipping on any order over $100.00 (after discounts). Use the promo code kinyoubi2018 at checkout to get the discount.

John Neal Bookseller has two offers:

  • Get free standard domestic shipping on orders of $100.00 or more. Use code BF18FS at checkout for the discount from now through 11:59 p.m. on 11/25.
  • Get 10% to 50% off Black Friday Sale items from now through 6:00 p.m. on 11/30 (a full week!) – save on some of their most popular books and supplies.

As part of their holiday sale, Oak Knoll Books is offering 20% off select used/antiquarian titles and 50% off select publishing titles. This sale is going on now through November 27th and no special code is needed – the discount will automatically be applied to the cost of these books.

From now through 11/30, The Paper Mill Store is offering 10% off orders of $250.00 or more with code 250SALE and 15% off orders of $500.00 or more with code 500SALE. They also offer free shipping on all orders $149.00 and over.

Paper Source has a number of awesome deals going on, all valid now through 11/27:

  • Get free shipping on all orders over $50.00 (no code needed).
  • Buy fine paper online and get 25% off (no code needed).
  • Make an in-store purchase of fine paper, get a buy one, get one 50% off discount.
  • Get 50% off all purchases from the Paper Bar – they’ve got text and cover weight paper in lots of colors and sizes (no code needed).
  • Spend $50.00 in-store and get $10.00 or spend $100.00 and get $25.00 (I’m unclear on whether they mean gift cards or actual cash).

Now through 11/27, Paper-Papers is offering 50% off the already discounted price of products in their Clearance department. Use coupon code bigdeal at checkout to get the discount.

Pergamena, producer of stunning fine leathers and parchment, is offering free UPS Ground shipping on all orders over $100.00 Use coupon code FR33SHIPPING at checkout to get the discount.

From now through 11/25 at 11:30 p.m. GMT, Vintage Paper Co. is offering 20% off all purchases over £10 (approximately $13.00 USD). To get the discount, visit their website and click on the image of the papermaking man. The discount will automatically be applied, no code needed.

If you’ve got a bookbinding book on your wish list, you’re in luck! Amazon (yep, that Amazon) is offering $5.00 off print book purchases of $20.00 or more. From now until 11/25 at 11:59 p.m. PT, use code NOVBOOK18 at checkout to get the discount. Note: Offer only applies to products sold and shipped by Amazon.com.

By the way, don’t forget Giving Tuesday! There are tons of worthy organizations out there that would love your support. Here are some of my favorites:

Happy shopping and/or donating!

The Art of the Fold: Enclosures

Sadly, this post is my last in the series detailing my journey through Hedi Kyle and Ulla Warchol‘s new book, The Art of the Fold: How to Make Innovative Books and Paper Structures. Today I’m highlighting the structures in the last chapter, Enclosures

If you’re new to my blog, then you should know that I’ve been posting my structure of the day on Instagram, so be sure to follow me there. You can click on the name of each structure below and you’ll be taken to its related post over there.

Time to get wrapped up in enclosures!

30. Button Pouch
This structure isn’t just restricted to housing buttons – you can use it for any thin, three-dimensional object. 
The first time I made it, I wasn’t successful at getting the holes to line up with the buttons on the insert card. I think a better approach might be to start by placing your objects on the pouch panel where the holes are cut and trace around them. After that, cut out the holes and use that panel as a template for placing the buttons on the insert. It seems easier to redo the insert than to recreate the whole pouch.

Button Pouch - folded paper enclosure

Button Pouch - folded paper enclosure

31. Sling Fold
This structure is so clever – it can open like a traditional book or with a gentle pull it can be opened up to raise arches, revealing new surfaces beneath them. Hedi recommends using Elephant Hide paper for this project and YES YES YES. This structure requires you to repeatedly thread and coax paper through slits, so you need something that can handle the abuse.

Sling Fold - folded paper book

Sling Fold - folded paper book

32. Telescoping Ziggurat
Yeah, I had to look up what a ziggurat is. Many thanks to Wikipedia: “A ziggurat is a type of massive stone structure built in ancient Mesopotamia. It has the form of a terraced compound of successively receding stories or levels.” This structure has lots of folds but the process for making it isn’t difficult. You work on two different strips of paper and attach them together at the end. You could easily keep going and make a super ginormous one.

Telescoping Ziggurat - folded paper book

33. Star Box
This one is like a tool roll up, but made out of paper. The box consists of four triangular compartments that come together to form a square when looked at from the side. The math geek in me needs to point out that this means that the compartments are all right triangles. I wish I could talk about math more in my daily life.

Star Box - folded paper enclosure

34. School-Book Wrapper / with Pleat
This project gives you two structures in one. The School-Book Wrapper is similar to the book covers you made with paper grocery bags when you were in school. It’s a quick way to give some extra protection to a book. I made one for my Blizzard Book. I ran into a problem with the instructions – on step 6, you’re told to fold the covers to line up with the spine folds. If you do that, the covers don’t fit properly (not wide enough). When you cut your starting sheet of paper, add in 1 spine thickness to the 4x width measurement – this will get your covers to fit correctly (confirmed by Ulla).

School-Book Wrapper - folded paper book enclosure

The School-Book Wrapper with Pleat is a variation of the first structure with an added pocket to tuck in a wraparound cover flap. I used my Fishbone Fold for the text block (this is a suggestion of Hedi’s in the book). I added pieces of cover weight paper to the rear “bones” to stiffen them up – this made it easier to insert them into the wrapper.

School-Book Wrapper with Pleat - folded paper book enclosure

35. Slip Cases with Partial and Full Sides
This one is another twofer – you can enclose your book in the partial-sided slipcase and then enclose the whole shebang in the full-sided version.

Hedi recommends using a soft textured paper for this project and I think that’s a good call. I used reversible Unryu which starts out a bit crunchy, but softens as you work with it. First I made a partial slipcase for my Crown Book. Once the partial slipcase was completed, I had to tease out its sides a bit until they fully covered the sides of the book. 

Slip Cases with Partial Sides - folded paper book enclosure

I made both partial and full-sided slipcases for my Blizzard Book. The three components all fit together quite nicely.

Slip Cases with Partial and Full Sides - folded paper book enclosures

36. Self-Closing Wrapper
This project is a nice way to end the book – it wasn’t very complicated and it felt like I got to make something that would give my Flag Book a hug. The structure has an integrated flap that tucks into a subtle pocket, making for a tidy and secure wrapper.

Self-Closing Wrapper - folded paper book enclosure

Self-Closing Wrapper - folded paper book enclosure

Many thanks to all of you who joined me on my folding adventures! I hope you find the book as enjoyable and informative as I do. And if you’ve been on the fence about getting a copy, get off the fence!

This thing is pure gold. C’mon, it’s HEDI KYLE.

Book Arts Guide to Vermont Open Studio Weekend

Handmade journal by Elissa CampbellWelcome to your Book Arts cheat sheet for Spring Open Studio Weekend 2018!

As I mentioned in my previous postVermont Open Studio Weekend (May 26 & 27) is rapidly approaching. As a book artist, it’s important to me to support other folks working in the field and that’s why I dedicate a blog post just to them. There are five book artsy studios participating (besides mine) this spring.

I created the Google map at the bottom of this post which includes all of the studios to help you plan your travels. I wish I could say that the book arts studios are close to each other, but sadly, they’re not.

I’ll be referring to studios by both name and number – the number refers to a listing in the gold Spring Event and Resource Guide. The colors of the studio numbers in this post match the colored markers in the Google map. By the way, I’m studio #160.

There are several ways to get your hands on a map:

I tried to find the most direct route between the studios so you could avoid backtracking. This route starts at the northernmost studio and travels counterclockwise. Here we go!

The first studio is #5, Meta Strick – she does it all. Oh my goodness, her calligraphy! She does wonderful mixed media work, including dolls that have a book component. She has a great philosophy that you can make anything into a book – it should come as no surprise to you that she’s a teacher.

Next stop is studio #37, Shelburne Pond Studios, where you’ll find Jill Abilock of Six Loons Studio. She creates one-of-a-kind work that is really inspirational. And really structurally complex (I don’t know how she does how she does). Her compelling storytelling and creative voice are enhanced by her innovative combinations of materials and structure.

#66 is Carolyn Shattuck, a seasoned printmaker and bookmaker. She often cuts up scrap monotypes and uses the pieces in her handmade books. For her, the book arts have been the focus of a body of work combining drawing and print assemblage techniques in three dimensional form. Many of her books include pop-up elements to set the scene for her deeply personal storytelling.

Last stop on the tour is studio #159 – Kelly McMahon of May Day Studio. Kelly is both a letterpress printer and a bookbinder. She carves many of her designs in linoleum for her beautiful gift wraps (which are totally frame-able). She was lucky enough to intern at the San Francisco Center for the Book, so you know she’s got skills. Kelly’s studio is about 1.6 miles from mine.

If you make it to central Vermont this weekend (if you visit me, you’ll be in the right place), you’ll get a bonus – head over to Studio Place Arts (#161) in Barre, VT to view the exhibit Beyond Words: Artworks by the Book Arts Guild of Vermont. Yep, it’s a whole collection of book work in one place! I have a piece in the exhibit, so you definitely should check it out.

If you go to any of the studios, please share your experiences in the comments below. And if you have pictures, I’d love to see them…you can even do a guest post on my blog!

A Bookbinder’s Black Friday

A Bookbinders Black Friday - logo

Yeah, so it’s Black Friday.

In Montpelier, where I live, they’ve dubbed it Flannel Friday – much more appropriate to the Vermont lifestyle. You show up to local shops wearing flannel and kablammo! You get a discount on your purchase. There’s also a Cider Monday, which is supposed to be the Cyber Monday alternative. Love.

We hosted Thanksgiving this year with a total of 23 people and 3 dogs – it was nuts. A happy and awesome kind of nuts, but nuts nonetheless.

Even though I am totally exhausted, there’s no time for rest – I have a craft show that opens tomorrow, the fabulous Women’s Festival of Crafts. If you happen to be in the vicinity of Burlington, VT tomorrow or Sunday, come on by my booth and say hi!

That said, there are quite a few bookbinding-related online sales going on today (and some beyond that). Check ’em out:

From now through 11/27 at midnight GMT, Vintage Paper Co. is offering 25% off all products listed on this page of their website. Use code bf at checkout to get the discount.

John Neal Bookseller is going bananas with all the deals.

  • Get free standard shipping (within the U.S.) on orders of $100.00 or more. Use code BF17FS at checkout for the discount from now through 11:59 p.m. on 11/25.
  • Get 10% to 50% off Black Friday Sale items from now through 6:00 p.m. on 12/1 (a full week!) – save on some of their most popular books and supplies.
  • All Londonderry thread is 20% off, including individual spools, sets, and lacing thread.
  • Two great bookbinding books by Don Etherington are on sale. Bookbinding & Conservation: A Sixty-year Odyssey of Art and Craft is priced at $24.95 and Don Etherington: Design Bindings, A Retrospective is priced at $19.95.

Pergamena, producer of stunning fine leathers and parchment, is offering free UPS Ground shipping on all orders over $100.00 Use coupon code FR33SHIPPING at checkout to get the discount.

As part of their holiday sale, Oak Knoll Books is offering 40% off select titles from their website. This sale is going on now through November 27th and no special code is needed – the discount will automatically be applied to the cost of these books.

Arnold Grummer is offering a 10% discount on all paper essentials, such as supplies, fibers, and presses. Use code DIYPAPER (not to be confused with DIAPER) at checkout to get the discount.

Now through midnight EST, Paper Mojo is offering 25% off storewide. Use code use code BF2017X at checkout to get the discount. Time to stock up on handmade and decorative papers!

Paper Source is offering free shipping on all orders over $50.00 – no code is needed.

From now through 11/30, The Paper Mill Store is offering 10% off orders of $250.00 or more with code 250SALE and 15% off orders of $500.00 or more with code 500SALE.

Paper-Papers is offering 60% off the already discounted price of products in their Sale and Clearance categories. Use coupon code floor at checkout to get the discount.

If you’ve got a bookbinding book on your wish list, you’re in luck! Amazon (yep, that Amazon) is offering $5.00 off print book purchases of $20.00 or more. From now until 11/26 at 2:59 a.m. EST, use code GIFTBOOK17 at checkout to get the discount. Note: Offer only applies to products sold and shipped by Amazon.com.

And if Cyber Monday is more your thing:

On 11/27 Mechling Bookbindery is offering 40% off all instructional DVD series and 40% off your choice of leather. Free shipping is available for orders over $250.00.

By the way, don’t forget Giving Tuesday! There are tons of worthy organizations out there that would love your support. Here are some of my favorites:

Happy shopping and/or donating!

Dream job – G. F Smith’s Paper Consultants

As is my way, I was in the midst of an unfocused internet browse when I encountered the G.F. Smith website. Originating in London, the company has been supplying creative industries with paper for over 130 years. To say that they’re just a paper distributor is simply not okay.

Check out their Founding Legacy

G.F. Smith Founding Legacy

Damn, I like these guys.

And damn, I wish I could work for them – they’ve got Paper Consultants on staff. Check out the description of this dream job below:

G.F. Smith Paper Consultant job description

Dreamy.

If you live in England and happen to be in the neighborhood of either London or Hull, you can make a Paper Appointment. Actually, you must make a Paper Appointment.

And report back.

With pictures.

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