Category : Book Artists

Book Arts Guide to Vermont Open Studio Weekend

Handmade Journal - Wild Cherry MonoJournalWelcome to the 2012 Book Arts Guide to Vermont Open Studio Weekend

It’s time for my annual nod to the many book artists participating in Open Studio Weekend. All of these talented folks are also members of the Book Arts Guild of Vermont, an organization I hold near and dear to my heart.

I created the Google map below, which includes all the studios to help you plan your travels. Unfortunately, the book arts studios aren’t very close to each other. By the way, I’m studio #211.

I’ll be referring to studios by both name and number – the number refers to a listing in the Vermont Studio Tour Guide. The colors of the studio numbers in this post match the colored markers in the Google map below.

There are several ways to get your hands on a map:

First stop on the book arts tour is #88 Carolyn Shattuck. A seasoned printmaker, Carolyn cuts up scrap monotypes and uses the pieces in her handmade books. Many of her books include pop-up elements to set the scene for her storytelling.

The Book Arts Guild of Vermont has had a wonderful relationship with the Creative Space Gallery over the past few years. As stop #125, the gallery will host the Guild’s spring exhibit, Shaping Pages. The exhibit includes fine bindings and artist books that explore the essential foundations of art in their shape, composition, content, color and more.

#130 When you visit Shelburne Pond Studios, you get two book artists for the price of one! Elizabeth Rideout of Wise Eye Bindery is a master of leather bindings. She’s a graduate of the drool-worthy North Bennet Street School’s bookbinding program and the current Chair of the Book Arts Guild of Vermont.

Jill Abilock of Six Loons Studio creates one-of-a-kind work that is really inspirational. Her compelling storytelling and creative voice are enhanced by her innovative combinations of materials and structure. One of her pieces was recently featured in Vermont newspaper Seven Days.

Studio #135 belongs to Marianna Holzer, a third generation bookbinder following in the footsteps of her father and grandfather.  Using some of her dad’s old tools, Marianna works on custom bindings and restoration. Check out her feature on WCAX.

Next stop is #172 Meta Strick. Meta has a great philosophy that you can make anything into a book and she’s been teaching for years. In 2011, she participated in The Sketchbook Project and her sketchbook is available for viewing online.

The last stop is #186 Ken Leslie. Ken primarily creates books in a circular format – a practice that developed out of his dissatisfaction with rectangular painting shapes. His themes often focus on natural cycles, such as day and night. The size of his work ranges from miniature to really ginormous – you can walk through some of his books when they’re open.

If you do go to any of the studios, share your experiences here and I will live vicariously through you. If you have any pictures, I’d love to see them…you can even do a guest post on my blog!


View Make that Book Arts Tour map bigger!

Paper and Book Intensive 2012

Made-up logo for the Paper and Book IntensiveI’m in a total state of shock.

On Sunday morning, I’ll be flying out to Michigan for the Paper and Book Intensive. I’m actually going.

I had convinced myself that I was never going to go. I applied two years ago and wasn’t accepted – that’s the kind of thing that sets the Brain of Doom in motion. The Brain of Doom sucks.

But I’m actually going. To Ox-Bow.

I’m attending the following workshops:

Album Alter­na­tives with Betsy Palmer Eldridge:

The recent pop­u­lar­ity of albums has led to an increased inter­est in the vari­ety of album struc­tures avail­able and in the dif­fer­ent ways mate­ri­als can be attached to the album leaves. This ses­sion will intro­duce and show exam­ples of many of the his­tor­i­cal meth­ods. In addi­tion, it will show two lesser-known but use­ful meth­ods. The first is how to include folio mate­r­ial with­out a thread inter­rup­tion in the gut­ter mar­gin: the sec­ond is how to bind stiff leaf mate­r­ial using the 1865 Philadel­phia Patented method. The advan­tages and dis­ad­van­tages of each will be dis­cussed. Par­tic­i­pants will make take-home mod­els of as many of these meth­ods as the time allows and their inter­est dictates.

I received an Email from Betsy a week ago that said “Just found your name on my PBI participants list and look forward to having you in my class.” [insert Elissa’s faint here] Yes. I’m a geek.

Cus­tom Bone and Steel Tools for Book Working with Shanna Leino:

Dur­ing this class you will be work­ing with two very handy and ver­sa­tile mate­ri­als: elk bone and steel. First, stu­dents will be intro­duced to the tools and tech­niques needed to form and fin­ish bone fold­ers of ones own design. Smooth, pol­ished to a shine, and fit­ting per­fectly in your hand—there is noth­ing like the feel of a bone folder you’ve made your­self. You will then cross over to steel, learn to make a chas­ing tool and a stamp for mak­ing an impres­sion into most met­als and use­ful for adding orna­men­ta­tion on your book cov­ers. Sim­ple meth­ods of adding adorn­ment to your tools will be demon­strated. No pre­vi­ous expe­ri­ence is nec­es­sary, how­ever this class is demand­ing on the hands and arms. Expect to leave with two or three bone fold­ers and one chas­ing tool that will be beau­ti­ful to look at and won­der­ful to use!

I’m psyched to meet Shanna for many reasons, one of them being that she’s from New Hampshire. It’s great to have such a wonderful resource close to home and I plan to talk to her about doing a workshop for the Book Arts Guild of Vermont.

Using a Cat­a­lyst for Artist Book Creation with John Car­rera:

The Pic­to­r­ial Webster’s was always intended to be used as a cat­a­lyst for cre­ative writ­ing. Stu­dents’ main instruc­tional assign­ment will be to write a story based on one page of images. Using Pic­to­r­ial Webster’s as a source for cre­ative input in a class will be excit­ing, as what one makes from the book is never about the book, but what is inside each per­son. Because each stu­dent is using a com­mon ref­er­ence, under­stand­ing what has tran­spired within the cre­ative engine of each student’s mind can be more read­ily under­stood and dis­cussed. The goal will be to find new meth­ods for inspir­ing the cre­ative process. An intense four days will begin with cre­at­ing three books in an hour. You will then be given three dif­fer­ent meth­ods for using Pic­to­r­ial Webster’s as a source for your own new artist book. Each par­tic­i­pant will cre­ate at least one work­able dummy for a future edi­tion of your own or a fin­ished one-of-a-kind. Stu­dents will make use of addi­tional sec­tions from the off­set ver­sion of the book.

John’s Pic­to­r­ial Webster’s was the set book for the New England Chapter of the Guild of Book Workers‘ juried exhibition deFINEd BINDINGS: 26 Bindings of the Pictorial Webster’s Dictionary. So cool.

There’s internet access at Ox-Bow, but I don’t know how accessible the access is. I hope to blog at the end of each day so you can see what I’m up to at PBI. One way or another (if not daily), I’ll blog about the workshops.

Stay tuned!

Scratching the Surface: Disguising and Embellishing Wood with Daniel Essig

This blog post is the first in a series of four posts detailing the presentations I attended at the Guild of Book Workers 2011 Seminar on Standards of Excellence in Hand Bookbinding.

It isn’t my intention to describe these presentations blow-by-blow (although I’ll probably do it anyway). Instead, I hope to give you the flavor of each presentation, along with highlighting interesting tips and/or techniques.

I was late to the first seminar because I experienced some travel confusion (stupid Boston traffic…grumble, grumble). Thankfully, I had a wonderful travel companion to help keep my spirits up – thanks Jill!

First up – Daniel Essig‘s Scratching the Surface: Disguising and Embellishing Wood. Since I arrived late, I ended up in the back row. Here’s the view:

Daniel Essig presentation from the back of the room

It’s just like you were there…isn’t it?

Dan said that when he researches wood finishes, he looks to African sculpture for inspiration. Among his techniques for distressing wood: burning, scoring, scraping, scratching, hammering, gouging, and carving. He likes to create no more than five marks with any one tool.

Dan Essig's tools

Quartersawn boards are more stable and are therefore, preferable for book covers. In a nutshell, they warp less. One of the funniest things Dan said was how if you carve wood with your hands in front of your chisel, then you are working in the “ER Position”. (I’m probably the last to hear that one.)

When burning wood, you’ll get a more dramatic effect if you use wood with an open grain. You should always burn wood on both sides to help avoid warping (the technique dries out the wood).

Wood demo pieces

 Among his other tips:

  • Use oil-free steel wool.
  • “You can’t steel wool too much.”
  • Use a Dremel to outline the wood grain.
  • Cloth-backed sandpaper holds up better.
  • Carve with the grain of the wood to prevent splintering.

Daniel Essig presentation on a video monitor

Among Dan’s finishing products – milk paint, paste wax, and Kiwi shoe polish.

You can buy milk paint in powder form and mix it yourself. If you keep the paint powder in an airtight container, it will last longer. Extra-Bond can be used as a base for creating your own milk paint colors.

Wood demo pieces

When applying paste wax, use a soft cloth. To polish, use a rough paper towel.

Wood demo pieces

Dan spent some time talking about his use of Cave Paper, which everyone at the conference seemed to love (it was pretty fabulous). He applies the paper to wood and after painting the surface, it looks just like leather.

He crumples up the paper, opens it up, then crumples it up again. Repeating this process breaks up the gelatin sizing and creates random cracks in the paper’s surface.

He advised that using a weatherproof glue is preferable when applying the paper – he likes Titebond II because it has a good initial tack. When attaching the paper, get rid of the air bubbles, but keep the ridges.

The best part of the presentation was when Dan talked about the centipede binding (a.k.a. caterpillar binding). I have had mixed success with this binding and have been desperate to conquer it. He recommended that when plotting out the centipede’s path, keep it in a straight line. I think that this is what has been my downfall, getting too creative and curvy with my centipedes.

Dear Dan, that tip alone was worth the price of admission. 🙂

He said that the centipede binding was developed by Keith Smith in 1988. I’ve also heard references to Betsy Palmer Eldridge with regards to this binding. In order to avoid taking sides, I’m going to claim simultaneous development.

I’m still flabbergasted by the fact that I actually touched his work. My hands were on his books. See the books in these pictures? I touched them.

Handmade books by Dan Essig

Handmade book by Dan Essig

LOVED Dan’s presentation.

I’ve always wanted to take one of his classes and was thisclose to reaching my goal this past summer. Unfortunately, the class was canceled. Poo.

Mark my words, one day it will happen. Oh yes, it will happen.

Book Arts Guild of Vermont visit to UVM Special Collections

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a meeting of the Book Arts Guild of Vermont. This month’s meeting was our annual trip to UVM Special Collections at the Bailey/Howe Library. As I’ve mentioned before, Special Collections at UVM has a spectacular artist book collection and is well-regarded by the College Art Association.

I always get a lot out of our visits – Prudence Doherty does a wonderful job of selecting books for us to view. If I remember correctly, the book themes chosen for us included home, food, and animals.

I loved the letterpressed Meatball Math, by Alice Austin. The structure was cool – kind of like a caterpillar. I’m also big fan of math and orange things.

 "Meatball Math" handmade artist book by Alice Austin

I loved this colophon for Out West by Carol Blinn of Warwick Press. It included swatches of two materials used in both the book and its accompanying box – Japanese Sugi Veneer and De Wint handmade paper. I’d love to include swatches in my colophons going forward.

Colophon for "Out West" by Carol Blinn of Warwick Press

I adored Common Threads by Candace Hicks. This book is one of a series of hand-embroidered canvas books created in the style of a composition notebook. Everything is hand-stitched – every single word.

The book is insane. In a good way.

"Common Threads" handmade book by Candace Hicks

Page spread of "Common Threads" handmade book by Candace Hicks

The precision of Laura Davidson‘s Mapping My World was really impressive:

Handmade book by Laura Davidson - "Mapping My World"

I liked the cover technique on The Mexican Dog-Tosser by Lois Morrison. She cut out the letters from a light piece of paper and then layered it over a darker material to make the letters appear.

Handmade book by Lois Morrison - "The Mexican Dog-Tosser"

I usually leave Special Collections feeling both inspired and overwhelmed – I get such a flood of ideas. Thankfully, I take detailed notes and can refer to them in the future when I’m ready.

The Awesomeness of Peter and Donna Thomas

Peter and Donna Thomas are awesome.

There, I said it.

I first met them when I attended the Focus on Book Arts conference in 2009. I was fortunate enough to attend one of their miniature book workshops.

Loved it.

Then they came to Vermont to lecture at UVM Special Collections and to teach a workshop for the Book Arts Guild of Vermont. It was then that I fell in love with one of their editioned books, but stupidly didn’t buy it.

I thought about that book for a year. It conveyed a message that was so perfect for the time in my life when I saw it. I missed it.

So I did something about it. Now mine.

Miniature book by Peter & Donna Thomas

Miniature book by Peter & Donna Thomas

Miniature book by Peter & Donna Thomas

Miniature book by Peter & Donna Thomas

The book measures 1 5/16″ x 1″ x 1/4″. It’s bound in leather and all of the pages are letterpressed. The copyright date makes me laugh – the book’s sentiment was probably appropriate back then too.

I love it.

There was a post on the Book Arts listserv today that mentioned that Peter and Donna had taped an interview with Park City Television. You can watch it below.

Did I mention how awesome they are?

About Innovative Bookbinding

Shereen LaPlantz's "Innovative Bookbinding: Secret Compartments and Hidden Messages"

For the past week, there has been a flurry of activity on the Book Arts listserv around the book Innovative Bookbinding: Secret Compartments and Hidden Messages by Shereen LaPlantz.

This seems to have spurred a number of online searches for the book, as folks are trying to find a copy for themselves. As a result, people have found my blog post about when I got a copy of the book.

I’ve also heard from a few folks via Email, asking if I’d sell/rent my copy or if I’d be willing to photocopy/scan pages so they can them.

To answer the first question – nope, not selling or renting it. This book is such a priceless treasure and frankly I’m dumbfounded by the fact that I actually own a copy. I’m sure everyone understands why it isn’t leaving my possession.

And now the second question – I’m not willing to scan or make copies of pages at this time. I would be very upset if someone made copies of one of my books and did so without my permission. I feel that this book deserves the same respect.

However, I do understand everyone’s interest in the book. That’s why I contacted David LaPlantz, Shereen’s husband. I explained that people are eager to see the content of the book and that they would be overjoyed if the book were ever reprinted.

I also told him of my intention of writing a blog post about the book, which would include a few photos. I told him that I did not feel comfortable making scans of pages without his permission as I have great respect for copyright ownership.

He quickly responded and told me that he wanted some time to think about it, which I think is more than fair. I told him that whatever choice he makes, he should put Shereen first. I’ll keep you posted on how things develop.

That said, I do have other ways to share Shereen’s book. I’ll be attending the Guild of Book WorkersStandards Seminar in Boston later this year. I am more than happy to bring the book with me so people can check it out.

And if you’re ever in Vermont, contact me and I’ll figure out a way for you to come to my studio for a book look. I’m participating in Vermont Open Studio Weekend from October 1 -2, 2011 and during that event, you can stop by any time from 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

For those of you far from Vermont, I did a search on WorldCat and found that there a number of libraries in the United States with copies of the book. I also discovered that there’s a video of Shereen talking about her book collection.

Now I just have to figure out a time to drive out to Rochester…

Update 8/2/11: David LaPlantz just informed me that he has some VHS copies of Shereen’s Prowling Video (the video mentioned above) – he’s offering them for sale at $30.00 (includes shipping). The video is two hours long.

From David:

This is the last project Shereen worked on before she made her final transition in 2003, a real testament to her love for books, bookbinding and communication of image and print.

If you’d like to purchase a video, please send a check (payable to David LaPlantz) to the following address:

David LaPlantz
69A Las Estrellas
Santa Fe, NM 87507-4230
Phone: 505-438-2469
Email: laplantz1@cybermesa.com

Marketing 101 for Book Artists with Laura Russell

I had the pleasure of attending the Focus on Book Arts conference last month and one of the highlights was Laura Russell‘s keynote, Marketing 101 for Book Artists. She is not only the owner of 23 Sandy Gallery, which has book arts as the focus of gallery exhibitions, but is also a book artist herself.

Laura gave lots of good advice during her keynote. The point she couldn’t stress enough – be good at shameless self-promotion. The only person you can count on to be your biggest fan is yourself.

Marketing isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but it’s necessary if you want to get your name and your work out there. There are a number of ways to gain exposure:

  • Submit your work to juried shows: Galleries will often produce an exhibition catalog, which will include your work. The great thing about this is that you gain exposure long after the exhibit closes. In addition, a gallery will advertise their shows and this could have a larger reach than your marketing efforts – they will get your work in front of a new audience.
  • Sell to organizations with special collections: This includes public libraries, university libraries, and museums.
  • Self-marketing: Use your blog, Email newsletter, listservs, press releases, Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, etc. to announce anything new – new work, events, awards and recognition, important acquisitions – who just purchased your work?

Delving further into self-marketing, if you like writing – share what you know. Your experience and knowledge may be of great value to others in the field. Show others that you’re an “expert” and you’ll gain exposure.

There are several ways to do this:

Paid and/or free advertising is another way to get exposure. With print media, you can take out ads in magazines, newsletters, or directories. There are also online directories where you can list your business, such as Google Places. Book arts-related options include Artist Book News, Artist Book Yearbook, Miniature Book Society, Moveable Book Society, or the Book Arts Newsletter.

Laura said something that I’m sure most of us already know:

The book arts world in underpriced for what we have as original art.

Pricing is a sticky issue! She suggested that when you set your prices, take your experience level into account – until you have made a name for yourself, it will be hard to sell your work at high prices. Try checking out work that is similar to yours – what are those books selling for?

Start low and increase your prices as needed – it’s hard to go down and those who have already purchased your work will be angry that they were charged a higher price. For the same reason, you want to keep your pricing consistent across all venues – it’s unfair to undercut your galleries and no one wants to feel like they’ve been overcharged.

Some options on how to sell new edition work:

  • Pre-publication discounts: If someone buys your work in advance, they get a special deal. Once the work has been completed, the price goes up. This is a great way to help institutions (universities, libraries) to stretch their budgets.
  • Standing order plans: Libraries and other institutions will sometimes get a “subscription” to your work, meaning that they will automatically receive every new piece you produce.

Laura recommended that for every book you create, you write a book information sheet. Librarians find this document useful because it’s used for their cataloging system. This document includes anything relevant to your work, including:

  • Artist statement
  • Biography
  • Directions on how to set up your book for display
  • Colophon/technical details
  • Photograph

You can view a pdf sample book information sheet on page 11 of Artists’ Books Creative Production and Marketing by Sarah Bodman.

Laura had some suggestions on how to approach dealers, galleries, and libraries. Be sure to look for submission policies on website, including who to contact, how to contact them, and how to submit your work. Make sure you are sending them everything they ask for – artist statement, resume, slides/jpegs, etc. You don’t want to irritate anyone just because you failed to do your research.

Whenever possible, schedule an appointment, don’t just drop in – be respectful of others’ time. For more information, check out Laura’s great blog article, The Business of Being an Artist: How To Get Your Work Into Art Galleries.

I hope this information has been useful to you. Laura Russell has such a wealth of knowledge that I wanted to share it with you.

Below you will find a number of resources to help you with marketing your work. If you have any other resources you’d like to share, please send me an Email and I’ll write a follow-up post.

 


 

Resources:

Listservs:

Book shows and fairs:

Artist Book dealers:

Retail book stores:

Art Galleries:

Book Arts Resources:

General Resources:

 


 

Note: This post was originally published on the Bookbinding Etsy Street Team blog.

If you’d like to learn more about Laura Russell, here’s how you can connect with her:

Website: www.23Sandy.com
Blog: www.23sandygallery.blogspot.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/23sandygallery

Book Arts Guide to Vermont Open Studio Weekend

Handmade Journal - Wild Cherry MonoJournalWelcome to the 2011 Book Arts Guide to Vermont Open Studio Weekend

It’s time for my annual nod to the many book artists participating in Open Studio Weekend. All of these talented folks are also members of the Book Arts Guild of Vermont, an organization I hold near and dear to my heart.

I created the Google map below, which includes all of the studios to help you plan your travels. Unfortunately, the book arts studios aren’t very close to each other. By the way, I’m studio #213.

I’ll be referring to studios by both name and number – the number refers to a listing in the Vermont Studio Tour Guide. The colors of the studio numbers in this post match the colored markers in the Google map below.

There are several ways to get your hands on a map:

First stop on the book arts tour is #93 Carolyn Shattuck. A seasoned printmaker, Carolyn cuts up scrap monotypes and uses the pieces in her handmade books. Many of her books include pop-up elements to set the scene for her storytelling. One of her books is among the many amazing pieces in Inventive Structures: Books beyond the Codex, an exhibition juried by Hedi Kyle.

#132 When you visit Shelburne Pond Studios, you get two book artists for the price of one! Elizabeth Rideout of Wise Eye Bindery is a master of leather bindings. She’s a graduate of the drool-worthy North Bennet Street School’s bookbinding program and the current Chair of the Book Arts Guild of Vermont. I seriously envy her collection of tools.

Jill Abilock of Six Loons Studio creates one-of-a-kind work that is really inspirational. Her compelling storytelling and creative voice are enhanced by her innovative combinations of materials and structure. One of her pieces was recently featured in Vermont newspaper Seven Days.

#138 Nancy Stone is the third stop on the tour. Nancy is one of the founders of the Book Arts Guild of Vermont. Not only is Nancy an amazing book artist, she is also a well-known teacher in the books arts throughout Vermont and has inspired many students. In addition to her bookmaking, Nancy also works in watercolors and often incorporates painting techniques in her work.

Next stop is #171 Meta Strick. Meta has been my super-awesome booth neighbor at the Vermont Hand Crafters holiday show for several years. During slow moments, I usually wander in her booth to look at her wonderful mixed-media pieces. She has a great philosophy that you can make anything into a book. 

The last stop is #183 Ken Leslie. Ken primarily creates books in a circular format – a practice that developed out of his dissatisfaction with rectangular painting shapes. His themes often focus on natural cycles, such as day and night. The size of his work ranges from miniature to really ginormous – you can walk through some of his books when they’re open. Ken shared his work at a recent Guild meeting and it was wonderful!

If you do go to any of the studios, share your experiences here and I will live vicariously through you. If you have any pictures, I’d love to see them…you can even do a guest post on my blog!

Make that Book Arts Tour map bigger!

Big Ideas, Small Books exhibit at Emile Gruppe Gallery

Handmade miniature books by Elissa CampbellLast week I attended the opening reception for Big Ideas, Small Books, the spring member exhibition of the Book Arts Guild of Vermont.

The exhibit was so precious – it features artist books smaller than five inches in any dimension.

I wanted take some of the books and pop them in my mouth.

Don’t worry – I didn’t do it.

For the exhibit, I submitted all four books that I created during the Book Arts Improv in January. I was delighted to find that my books had been given their own wall! It was a small wall, in between a bathroom and a thermostat, but still awesome. 🙂

As I mentioned earlier, the exhibit was really fabulous. Here are some of my favorite pieces:

A tunnel book by Marcia Vogler – Sneek:

Handmade book "Sneek" by Marcia Vogler

A super-teeny book by Monica Feeney – Button Book:

Handmade book by Monica Feeney - "Button Book"

A tunnel-ish book by Jill Abilock – Love Illuminated Series – Eye of the Beholder:

Handmade book by  Jill Abilock - "Love Illuminated Series - Eye of the Beholder"

 

Every time the Book Arts Guild of Vermont has an exhibit, I am always impressed with the variety of work – it is such delight! I am so honored to be part of an organization that has such talented members.

If find yourself near Jericho, Vermont, you have to see the show. Here are the details:

Big Ideas, Small Books
April 17, 2011 – May 22, 2011

Emile A. Gruppe Gallery
22 Barber Farm Road
Jericho, VT 05465
(802) 899-3211
Gallery Hours: Thursday – Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. or by appointment

If you can’t make it in person, you can have a virtual visit by watching a slideshow of the exhibit on the Guild’s blog.

Guild of Book Workers’ Marking Time

Last November, I visited the Guild of Book Workers’ national exhibition Marking Time. If you happen to be in New Hampshire this week, you’ll be able to catch the show in its last days at the Dartmouth College Library in Hanover.

When I went to the show, it was actually for the opening reception (shows how long it took to write this!). It was fun to mingle with other bookish types outside of Vermont.

The show was wonderful. I loved this piece by Jody Alexander, Date Due: It’s Not A Popularity Contest. As the owner of two library card catalogs, I think it’s obvious why I’m drawn to it. I love the unraveling, fibrous page edges.

Another piece I was drawn to was December 1: The Hunt, by Alicia Bailey. Whenever I see a metronome, I’m reminded of the first time I attended a They Might Be Giants concert back in 1990. At that time they didn’t have a drummer, so they used a metronome to provide the percussion for their song Where Your Eyes Don’t Go. TMBG is my most favoritist band ever.

The text block is made of tinted Tyvek and the color is really luminous.

I loved Claire Jeanine Satin’s use of transparency in Pentimento/Marking Time:

The funniest thing about the exhibition is that I took pictures of books by Susan Collard and Karen Hanmer – it turns out that I’m going to be attending their workshops at the Focus on Book Arts conference in June.

I must have been having a psychic moment.

Susan is teaching Wood Shop Basics for the Book Artist – this is going to be the perfect course for me to build on my Dremel skills. Susan’s interest in alternative materials is reflected in the book she had in the show, A Short Course in Recollection.

Karen is teaching Biblio Tech: Reverse Engineering Historical and Modern Binding Structures. She not only had a piece in the exhibit, Celestial Navigation, but she also curated the exhibit.

Karen = Wonder Woman.

My only complaint was that the books were in locked cases, so you couldn’t touch them or see them from all sides. This seems to be an ongoing struggle for book artists – there’s a need to protect work when on display, yet books are generally meant to be experienced through direct contact.

Have you attended any book arts exhibits recently and if you did, were there limitations on how you could experience the work?

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