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Pres­sure Print­ing: A Painterly Approach to the Press with Sarah Bryant – Day 4

Today was my last class with Sarah. Sadness. I lovvveeddd her class.

We started off with a pochoir demonstration:

Sarah Bryant doing a pochoir demonstration

After that, she showed us a basic book structure that we could use to present our prints – she referred to it as a tipped folio book. She said that it’s a good structure for one-sided items.

Here’s the procedure (although most of you might already know this one):

    1. Fold the prints in half so that the content is on the inside of the folio.
    2. Line the folios up by the spine, then jog them to the head.
    3. On one folio, mask off an area of 1/8″ and apply straight PVA.

 

Gluing a folio for tipping in

 

  1. Attach the second folio, then put under weight.
  2. After the pairs of folios are done, pair together pairs of folios.
  3. Put x’s on the sides that need to be glued together.
  4. Repeat step #3 and attach to other pair of folios.
  5. Repeat the process until all of the folios are tipped together.

She recommended that you work on the folios in pairs so that it would be easier to keep things lined up.

For the cover, we used cover weight paper. Here’s the process:

  1. Make your first fold where the back edge of your text block will rest.
  2. Compress the text block, then add a bit. Mark a light pencil line on the cover stock.
  3. Score a line at the spot where you marked in pencil, using a ruler as a guide.
  4. Fold over at the score line.

Sarah used 3M 415 adhesive to attach the covers, but you could easily use PVA. The 415 takes a few hours to reach full attachment. To attach the covers to the text block:

  1. Start at the back.
  2. Bring the tape in slightly from the edge, then attach the text block to the cover.
  3. Push the text block against the spine with your fingers.
  4. Attach adhesive to the backside of the text block and adhere to the cover.
  5. Trim excess cover stock as needed.

Trimming the cover on a tipped folio book

The finished book structure:

Tipped folio book

Tipped folio book

After that, were left to work on our own books. I decided to wait until I get home to get working on my book. I think I might want to incorporate papers from my stash.

At the end of the day, we put out all of our work so we could see what everyone had done. It was amazing to see how much work had been generated in just 4 days – and 1/2 days at that! And with only ONE PRESS available to everyone!

Seriously amazing.

Examples of work by other students:

Student work from Sarah Bryant's Pressure Printing class at Paper and Book Intensive 2013

Student work from Sarah Bryant's Pressure Printing class at Paper and Book Intensive 2013

Student work from Sarah Bryant's Pressure Printing class at Paper and Book Intensive 2013

Student work from Sarah Bryant's Pressure Printing class at Paper and Book Intensive 2013

Student work from Sarah Bryant's Pressure Printing class at Paper and Book Intensive 2013

Student work from Sarah Bryant's Pressure Printing class at Paper and Book Intensive 2013

Student work from Sarah Bryant's Pressure Printing class at Paper and Book Intensive 2013

Student work from Sarah Bryant's Pressure Printing class at Paper and Book Intensive 2013

Student work from Sarah Bryant's Pressure Printing class at Paper and Book Intensive 2013

Student work from Sarah Bryant's Pressure Printing class at Paper and Book Intensive 2013

I highly recommend taking a class with Sarah if you have the chance. She has a wonderful teaching style and contagious positive energy.

And she makes amazing handouts.

2 Responses to “Pres­sure Print­ing: A Painterly Approach to the Press with Sarah Bryant – Day 4”

By Alison Kurke - 10 June 2013 Reply

Helpful write-up of your classes. Guess I could have skipped taking notes! 🙂

By Elissa - 18 June 2013 Reply

Alison –

Yeah, I’m a bit of a compulsive note taker.

Elissa

So what do you think? I'd love to know!

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