Elissa R. Campbell | Blue Roof Designs

What do those Dremel bits do? Well I’ll tell ya!

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Yeah, I’m an overachiever.

I originally thought I could fit all of my notes from Jill Timm‘s class, The Amazing Dremel, into one blog post.

Bwahahahahahahah!!!

I did not take into account how many notes I took during the workshop. In fact, my table neighbor at the workshop teased me for two days on how many notes I took.

My plan is to split the information into three blog posts:

Please note that this post only focuses on what the bits look like and what they do. Oh, and the bits mentioned are the only ones that we used in the workshop – we didn’t use any routing bits. Sorry.

That said, let’s talk Dremel bits.

I think that one of the things that both attracted me and freaked me out about the Dremel was its huge buffet of accessories. The packages are labeled by use, but it still seemed like gibberish to me. Jill created the perfect environment for overcoming my Dremel fear.

You can read about my class in the following blog posts:

This post is in no way meant to replace the total awesomeness of taking Jill Timm’s class. I benefited so much from hearing Jill’s experiences and seeing her work in person. If I had bought a Dremel and experimented with it on my own, most likely I would have never tried it on the range of materials that we did in class.

Jill recently announced that she’s taking her Dremel class on the road and would love to be scheduled by your group. I highly recommend the class if you have a chance to attend.

The main categories of bits, according to Dremel, include the following:

  1. Carving & Engraving
  2. Sanding
  3. Cutting
  4. Grinding & Sharpening
  5. Cleaning & Polishing

These categories are pretty consistent among other manufacturers of rotary tool accessories, so you can often find alternatives if you shop around. Carving & Engraving I used two different types of bits that fall into the carving & engraving category – diamond bits and high speed cutters.

Diamond Dremel bits

Diamond Dremel bits

Diamond bits can be used with the following materials:

  • Aluminum
  • Bookboard
  • Ceramic tile
  • Glass
  • Mirror
  • Steel
Dremel high speed cutters

Dremel high speed cutters

High speed cutters can be used with the following materials:

  • Bookboard
  • Linoleum
  • Polymer clay
  • Wood

Sanding

Sanding involves two different parts – the drum and the sanding band. Sanding bands come in different grits, just like sheets of sandpaper.

Dremel sanding bands and drum

Dremel sanding bands and drum

To use the sanding band, you simply slide it over the drum. Replace it when it wears out. Easy peasy.

Attaching a Dremel sanding band

Dremel sander ready to use

Sanding bits can be used with the following materials:

  • Aluminum
  • Bookboard
  • Plexiglass
  • Polymer clay
  • Wood

Cutting

There are different types of cutting wheels for different materials.

Dremel cut-off wheels

Abrasive cutting wheels

Abrasive cutting wheels can be used with the following materials:

  • Bookboard
  • Plexiglass
  • Wood
Dremel fiberglass cutting wheel

Fiberglass cutting wheel

Fiberglass cutting wheels can be used with the following materials:

  • Aluminum
  • Bookboard
  • Ceramic tile
  • Wood

To use a cutting wheel, you have to attach it a mandrel.

Dremel mandrel

Dremel mandrel

Unscrew the tiny screw on top of the mandrel and remove one of the washers.

Attaching Dremel cutting wheel

Slide the wheel onto the screw, then add the second washer. Attach the screw to the mandrel base and tighten.

Attached Dremel cutting wheel

Replace the wheel it when it wears out.

Grinding & Sharpening

Grinding and sharpening stones are made of two basic materials: silicon carbide (green bits) and aluminum oxide (brown, orange, pink, or grey bits). You may have noticed that some of my grinding stones are oddly-shaped. This is because the stones wear out with use. You can reshape your grinding stones using a dressing stone.

Dremel grinding stones

Orange stones

Orange stones can be used with the following materials:

  • Ceramic tile
  • Glass
  • Mirror
  • Steel
Dremel grinding stones

Blue/green  & Pink stones

Blue/green and pink stones can be used with the following materials:

  • Aluminum
  • Ceramic tile
  • Glass
  • Mirror

Cleaning & Polishing

Felt polishing wheels and cones are used in combination with polishing compound.

Dremel felt polishers

Dremel polishing felts and mandrel

Dremel polishing compound

Dremel polishing compound

To use a polishing felt, you have to attach it a mandrel (different from the cutting wheel mandrel). The felt has a tiny hole in the center of it – you screw the mandrel into the hole to attach it.

Attaching Dremel felt polisher

Attached Dremel felt polisher, ready to use

Felt polishing wheels and cones can be used with the following materials:

  • Aluminum
  • Ceramic tile
  • Glass
  • Mirror

For further reference, you can check out Dremel’s website for information on all of their attachments. Even better though, is this very sexy poster: Dremel Accessories Guide Poster. We got one of these posters from Jill in our workshop packet.

I can’t decide if I want to hang it in my studio…

128 Responses to “What do those Dremel bits do? Well I’ll tell ya!”

  1. Val G says:

    In my experience, it is possible to cut (thin) steel as well with the fiberglass cutting wheel. If you’re in a pinch and you have plenty to spare you can also cut (thinner) metals with the abrasive wheels. The most hilarious example I know of was when my dad used a Dremel tool to cut off a part of my brother’s broken braces… he said “I see sparks” and my dad said “I see more!” Anyhow, hopefully I can get my hands on one of those metal cut-off wheels to work on my next few projects instead of buying up fiberglass wheels.

  2. Kristi Northcutt says:

    Hi! I was checking out the link for buying Dremel bits that is out of the UK. I noticed that with each collection of bits, a specific Dremel model number was listed. Are the Dremel bits not universal to all Dremels? I had been thinking all bits could be used on any Dremel. I was actually going to purchase a collection in advance of purchasing a Dremel. I haven’t made up my mind which model I want yet. If they are model specific, I really need to know. I will have to quit procrastinating on my decision of which one to buy :(

    • Elissa says:

      Kristi -

      I don’t believe that bits/attachments are Dremel-specific. If any of them are, it will likely say something on the package. The different collets included with the Dremel are used to accommodate the assorted bit widths.

      I hope that answers your question.

      Elissa

  3. Kat says:

    Thank you for a very informative post. This really helped me understand the uses for all these bits. Love the photos!

  4. Thanks sooo much for your time and effort to share with the rest of us how to use the dremmel bits. I’ve watched most of dremmel videos and still didn’t feel competent to start.
    Your info answered my prayer today.
    All the best,
    Daniela

  5. Dawn says:

    Can I use the pink stones to sharpen knives?

  6. Stacy C P says:

    AWESOME site!!!!! Thank you, I have a ton of attachments and it’s been a guessing game for far too long.

    I have a piece of metal(don’t know what kind) with sharp edges and I want to smooth out the edges so no one gets tetanus(not good). After reading you AWESOME page I think I should use an orange stone, correct? Is there anything you would warn me of in advance?

    Thank you again for being so AWESOME!!!!!
    Stacy

    • Elissa says:

      Stacy -

      You’re so sweet! Thanks for the compliments. :)

      I believe that an orange stone would work for your job – unless the metal is harder than the stone, in which case the stone will just wear away. You have nothing to lose by giving it a try. Definitely wear goggles and protective clothing so you don’t get burned by any flying metal bits.

      Elissa

  7. Bobbie says:

    I am trying to figure out this dremel (3000) but it feels like a foreign language. Just trying to match up using visuals. I am hoping to work on a project cutting plastic, using a cutting wheel. However, I cannot find a MANDREL anywhere in this kit. Is this tiny piece imperative and if so, where can I purchase one? Thank you

    • Elissa says:

      Bobbie -

      You should be able to purchase a mandrel at your local hardware store – it’s a pretty standard attachment. You will definitely need one to be able to use a cutting wheel.

      Elissa

  8. Jan Richards says:

    Has anyone ever considered using a Dremel for a pedicure? If so, what tool or wheel?

  9. Bill says:

    Really nice and quick rundown of the Dremel bits. Thanks!

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